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哈克贝里·芬历险记(The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn)第四

双击单词可弹出解释框  时间:2010-07-16 21:15  作者:

WELL, three or four months run along, and it was well into the winter now. I had been to school most all the time and could spell and read and write just a little, and could say the multiplication table up to six times seven is thirty-five, and I don't reckon I could ever get any further than that if I was to live forever. I don't take no stock in mathematics, anyway.

At first I hated the school, but by and by I got so I could stand it. Whenever I got uncommon tired I played hookey, and the hiding I got next day done me good and cheered me up. So the longer I went to school the easier it got to be. I was getting sort of used to the widow's ways, too, and they warn't so raspy on me. Living in a house and sleeping in a bed pulled on me pretty tight mostly, but before the cold weather I used to slide out and sleep in the woods sometimes, and so that was a rest to me. I liked the old ways best, but I was getting so I liked the new ones, too, a little bit. The widow said I was coming along slow but sure, and doing very satisfactory. She said she warn't ashamed of me.

One morning I happened to turn over the salt-cellar at breakfast. I reached for some of it as quick as I could to throw over my left shoulder and keep off the bad luck, but Miss Watson was in ahead of me, and crossed me off. She says, "Take your hands away, Huckleberry; what a mess you are always making!" The widow put in a good word for me, but that warn't going to keep off the bad luck, I knowed that well enough. I started out, after breakfast, feeling worried and shaky, and wondering where it was going to fall on me, and what it was going to be. There is ways to keep off some kinds of bad luck, but this wasn't one of them kind; so I never tried to do anything, but just poked along low-spirited and on the watch-out.

I went down to the front garden and clumb over the stile where you go through the high board fence. There was an inch of new snow on the ground, and I seen somebody's tracks. They had come up from the quarry and stood around the stile a while, and then went on around the garden fence. It was funny they hadn't come in, after standing around so. I couldn't make it out. It was very curious, somehow. I was going to follow around, but I stooped down to look at the tracks first. I didn't notice anything at first, but next I did. There was a cross in the left boot-heel made with big nails, to keep off the devil.

I was up in a second and shinning down the hill. I looked over my shoulder every now and then, but I didn't see nobody. I was at Judge Thatcher's as quick as I could get there. He said:

"Why, my boy, you are all out of breath. Did you come for your interest?"

"No, sir," I says; "is there some for me?"

"Oh, yes, a half-yearly is in last night -- over a hundred and fifty dollars. Quite a fortune for you. You had better let me invest it along with your six thousand, because if you take it you'll spend it."

"No, sir," I says, "I don't want to spend it. I don't want it at all -- nor the six thousand, nuther. I want you to take it; I want to give it to you -- the six thousand and all."

He looked surprised. He couldn't seem to make it out. He says:

"Why, what can you mean, my boy?"

I says, "Don't you ask me no questions about it, please. You'll take it -- won't you?"

He says:

"Well, I'm puzzled. Is something the matter?"

"Please take it," says I, "and don't ask me nothing -- then I won't have to tell no lies."

He studied a while, and then he says:

"Oho-o! I think I see. You want to SELL all your property to me -- not give it. That's the correct idea."

Then he wrote something on a paper and read it over, and says:

"There; you see it says 'for a consideration.' That means I have bought it of you and paid you for it. Here's a dollar for you. Now you sign it."

So I signed it, and left.

Miss Watson's nigger, Jim, had a hair-ball as big as your fist, which had been took out of the fourth stomach of an ox, and he used to do magic with it. He said there was a spirit inside of it, and it knowed everything. So I went to him that night and told him pap was here again, for I found his tracks in the snow. What I wanted to know was, what he was going to do, and was he going to stay? Jim got out his hair-ball and said something over it, and then he held it up and dropped it on the floor. It fell pretty solid, and only rolled about an inch. Jim tried it again, and then another time, and it acted just the same. Jim got down on his knees, and put his ear against it and listened. But it warn't no use; he said it wouldn't talk. He said sometimes it wouldn't talk without money. I told him I had an old slick counterfeit quarter that warn't no good because the brass showed through the silver a little, and it wouldn't pass nohow, even if the brass didn't show, because it was so slick it felt greasy, and so that would tell on it every time. (I reckoned I wouldn't say nothing about the dollar I got from the judge.) I said it was pretty bad money, but maybe the hair-ball would take it, because maybe it wouldn't know the difference. Jim smelt it and bit it and rubbed it, and said he would manage so the hair-ball would think it was good. He said he would split open a raw Irish potato and stick the quarter in between and keep it there all night, and next morning you couldn't see no brass, and it wouldn't feel greasy no more, and so anybody in town would take it in a minute, let alone a hair-ball. Well, I knowed a potato would do that before, but I had forgot it.

Jim put the quarter under the hair-ball, and got down and listened again. This time he said the hairball was all right. He said it would tell my whole fortune if I wanted it to. I says, go on. So the hairball talked to Jim, and Jim told it to me. He says:

"Yo' ole father doan' know yit what he's a-gwyne to do. Sometimes he spec he'll go 'way, en den agin he spec he'll stay. De bes' way is to res' easy en let de ole man take his own way. Dey's two angels hoverin' roun' 'bout him. One uv 'em is white en shiny, en t'other one is black. De white one gits him to go right a little while, den de black one sail in en bust it all up. A body can't tell yit which one gwyne to fetch him at de las'. But you is all right. You gwyne to have considable trouble in yo' life, en considable joy. Sometimes you gwyne to git hurt, en sometimes you gwyne to git sick; but every time you's gwyne to git well agin. Dey's two gals flyin' 'bout you in yo' life. One uv 'em's light en t'other one is dark. One is rich en t'other is po'. You's gwyne to marry de po' one fust en de rich one by en by. You wants to keep 'way fum de water as much as you kin, en don't run no resk, 'kase it's down in de bills dat you's gwyne to git hung."

When I lit my candle and went up to my room that night there sat pap -- his own self!

  三四个月就这样过去了。如今是到了冬天了。在这段时间里,我大多是去学校的。我能
拼音,能读书,能写一点儿,会背乘法表,背到六七三十五②。可是要再背字去,我一辈子
也做不到了。反正我就不相信数学那一套。   

  ②诺顿版和企鹅丛书版等都说哈克“会背乘法表,背到六七三十五”,这里照译。
国内也有译本译为“背到五七三十五”的。本书译者认为马克·吐温原意,有可能是在戏谑
逗笑中对传统的教育制度讥刺一下。并且译者对原文无权改动。

    开头,我恨学校。不过,慢慢的,我变得能将就将就了。只要我厌倦得厉害,我就逃
学。第二天挨的揍对我也有好处,能给我鼓鼓劲。这样,上学的日子越长,也就越加好过
些。再说,对寡妇的那一套,我也习惯一些了,她们对我也不是那么急躁了。住在家里,睡
在床上,往往被管得够紧的。不过,冬季来临以前,我经常偷偷溜出去,有时候还睡在林子
里,这在我真是一种休息。我挺喜欢过去我那种生活。不过,慢慢的,我也有点儿喜欢新的
生活了。寡妇说我有长进,尽管慢些,可还稳当,表现不差。她说,她觉得我没有丢她的脸。
    一天早晨,吃早饭时,我打翻了盐罐。我急忙伸手抓一些盐,往左肩后面扔,免得遭到
恶运。不过华珍小姐已经抢在我前面,为我划了十字。她说,“哈克贝里,把手拿开——
你老是弄得一塌糊涂。”寡妇为我说了句好话。不过,这也不能叫我消灾避祸,这我心里明
白。早饭以后,我走出门来,心事重重,不知道哪里会有什么灾祸临头,又不知道会是什么
样的灾祸。有些灾祸是有法子防止的,不过目前可不是这样一类的灾祸,因此我也只能听之
任之,只是心里颓丧,打算事事留心些。
    我走过了下面屋前的园子,爬上梯子,爬过高高的木栅栏。地上已有寸把积雪,我看到
了有人留下的脚印。这些人是从采石场走过来的,在梯子旁边站了一会儿,然后绕过园子里
的栅栏往前去了。这些人在这里站了一会儿却没有进来,这有点儿怪。是怎么回事,我可摸
不清,反正有点儿离奇。我打算顺着脚印走,我弯下身来先看一看脚印,开头没有发现什
么,可是再一看,却发现有一个左边鞋跟上用大钉钉的十字留下的印子,那本是为了防邪才
钉上去的。
    我马上直起身子,一溜烟似地冲下山去。我往后边左右张望,不过没有发现什么人。一
会儿就飞快到了撒切尔法官家。
    “怎么啦,我的孩子,这么上气不接下气的,是为了你的利息来的么?”
    “不是的,先生,”我说,“是有些利息归我的么?”
    “哦,是的,昨晚上半年到期。有一百五十来块钱。对你来说,可是不小的一笔数目
啊。最好还是由我连同你的六千块钱一起生息,你一取去,就会花掉。”
    “不,先生,”我说,“我不打算花掉。这笔钱我不要——六千块钱也不要了。我要给
你——那六千块钱和所有的钱。
    他显得大吃一惊,仿佛摸不清头脑。他说:
    “怎么啦,你这是什么意思,我的孩子。”
    我说,“请你别问我问题,你会收下这笔钱的,是吧?”
    他说,“真把我搞胡涂了,是出了什么事吧?”
    “请收下,”我说,“别问我——我也不愿撒谎。”
    他考虑了一会儿,接着说:
    “哦,哦,我想我懂得了。你是想要把你全部财产都卖给我——不是给我。这是你的本
意。”
    接着,他在一张纸上写了些什么,立刻读了一下,然后说:
    “上面写着——你看是这样写的,‘作为报酬’。这意思是说,我从你那儿把这个买了
下来了,给你付过了钱的。这儿是一块钱。好吧,你在上面签个字吧。”
    我就签了字,走开了。
    华珍小姐的黑奴杰姆有一个拳头大的毛球,是从一只牛身上第四个胃里取出来的。他老
是用这个来施展法术①。据他说,这里面藏着一个精灵。这个精灵可是无所不知,无所不
晓。我就在一个晚上去找他,告诉他说,我爸又出现在这里了,因为我在雪地里发现了他的
脚印。我要问明白的是,他究竟想干些什么呢,还有他是否要在这里耽下去?杰姆就把毛球
取了出来,对着毛球口中念念有词,先往上一抛,再落到地上。落得稳稳当当,只滚了寸把
远。杰姆又来了第二回,然后又来了一回,情况跟第一回一个样。杰姆双膝趴地,耳朵凑着
毛球,仔细地听着。可是不济事。他说,它没有说话。还说,不给它钱,它有时候就不肯说
话。我对他说,我有一枚两角五分的旧伪币,又旧又光滑,已经不能用了,因为银币已经露
出一小块铜,反正人家不肯收了。即使没有把铜露了出来,也不好使用,因为旧得象抹上一
层油那样油腻腻的,一眼就给看出来了。(我心里盘算,法官给我的那块钱,我可不能说
啊。)我说,这是个伪币,不过毛球也许肯收下,因为它认不出真假所在。杰姆把伪币闻了
闻,咬了咬,擦了擦。他说,让他来想个法子,好叫毛球以为这是真的银币。他说他可以把
一块爱尔兰土豆掰开,把伪币夹在当中间,这样放一个晚上,第二天早上,你就看不见铜的
影子了,也不会滑腻腻的了。镇上的人谁都会一眼就收下它,不只是毛球会收。是啊,我原
本知道土豆有这个效果,可一下子把这个忘了。    

  ①诺顿版注:动物内脏里的东西,古代人认为可作占卜之用。

    杰姆把那个两角五分的钱币放在毛球下边,自己趴下身子来又听。这回?
了。他说,我要是想知道我一生命运的话,它会告诉我的。我说,好啊。这样,就由毛球告
诉了杰姆,再由杰姆告诉我。他说:
    “你的老爸爸还布(不)知道自己该做些什么呢。他有时候说要走,有时候又说要留。
最好的办法是听任老头儿哀(爱)怎么办就怎么办。他头上正有着两个天使在转。一个白
的,光闪闪,一个黑的。白的指点他正道,一会儿黑的又飞来,把事情弄得搞垮为止。现在
还不知道哪个会占上风。不过你不会有什么事。你一生中会有些马(麻)烦,也会有些灰
(欢)乐。你有时候会受到伤害,有时候会生病,不过到最后总会逢胸(凶)化吉。你这辈
子会有两个姑娘围着你转,一个皮肤白,一个黑。一个富,一个穷。你先娶的是穷的,后来
娶富的。你忌水,要尽可能离水远远的,别冒轩(险)。因为卦上说,你命中要杯(被)吊
死。”
    后来,当晚我点上蜡烛,走进我房间时,我爸爸正在那里。正是他本人。

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